Tutorials, References, Tips

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28,608 notes

ricelily:

All these pages are 8.5x11, 300 dpi. Feel free to print it out in full size if you like physical copies

Comics and Comic Artists

Jake Wyatt- deviantart tumblr

"Welcome To Summers"

"Soliloquy"

Suggested Reading/Books:

Scott McCloud’s “Making Comics” (entirely done in comic format)

Exercises/Practices/Tutorials:

Lettering

Speech Bubbles Mistakes

Paint Bucket Resource

Storyboarding and Camera angles

What is DPI?

Transferring Traditional to Digital (Photoshop Tutorial)

(via anatomicalart)

Filed under comics comic tutorial paneling

3,365 notes

costumecommunityservice:

[full size]
This is perhaps approaching graduate level information as far as digital costuming is concerned, but I think that the more fidelity professional game artists have access to, the more mindful the details ought to be. This is especially true in the case of low-tech/medieval/pre-industrial fantasy where everything in the world is handmade; these little details are really crucial to selling that look.

costumecommunityservice:

[full size]

This is perhaps approaching graduate level information as far as digital costuming is concerned, but I think that the more fidelity professional game artists have access to, the more mindful the details ought to be. This is especially true in the case of low-tech/medieval/pre-industrial fantasy where everything in the world is handmade; these little details are really crucial to selling that look.

Filed under tutorial advice stitching stitches costume design character design

7,742 notes

perplexingly:

theotherwesley:

ursulavernon:

A friend requested I make this, and so here it is, and I offer it to anyone who needs it, with all the authority vested in me by whoever vests these things. Print it out if you need to.
The best art advice ever given to me—ever, ever—was “Don’t be afraid to make bad art.”
You will make a whole lot of crap in your time. Some will be truly awful and some will be merely mediocre. And that is totally normal and totally fine and for the love of little green apples, just keep going, because that’s the only way I know to get to the good stuff eventually.
(I normally feel horribly egotistical mentioning my awards, but I think this counts as using that power for good.)

:’D i feel better now

WE HAD THIS FAILING EXERCISE AT SCHOOL - after you don’t succeed very well with arting, make your most successful pose and with your most successful voice say “I FAILED” \ o /

perplexingly:

theotherwesley:

ursulavernon:

A friend requested I make this, and so here it is, and I offer it to anyone who needs it, with all the authority vested in me by whoever vests these things. Print it out if you need to.

The best art advice ever given to me—ever, ever—was “Don’t be afraid to make bad art.”

You will make a whole lot of crap in your time. Some will be truly awful and some will be merely mediocre. And that is totally normal and totally fine and for the love of little green apples, just keep going, because that’s the only way I know to get to the good stuff eventually.

(I normally feel horribly egotistical mentioning my awards, but I think this counts as using that power for good.)

:’D i feel better now

WE HAD THIS FAILING EXERCISE AT SCHOOL - after you don’t succeed very well with arting, make your most successful pose and with your most successful voice say “I FAILED” \ o /

(via ashelisms)

Filed under motivation

30,367 notes

Varying Your Body Types

dredsina:

By me, Sara D. (Heh.)

I think it’s very important for artists to vary the types of bodies they draw! Not only does it add visual interest and diversity, but different body types can enhance your characters! (Plus it’s more realistic; when was the last time you walked down the street and everyone had the same body type?) I know I have a hard time drawing different bodies, especially with men, so I’m making this tutorial to teach myself as well (I’ve heard the best way to cement learning something is to teach someone else).

So! Bodies! I’m going to use women for this tutorial because I feel they have more variety in their bodies. One of the most obvious ways bodies differ is in their amount of fat.

image

image

image

image

[Click here for full size]

On average, people store fat mostly in core areas like the bust, the waist, and the hips. It is important to remember that people gain and lose weight differently, and this is true no matter how fat or skinny one gets. However, these are common places people store fat:

image

The face and neck can be immediate indicators as to how much fat the rest of the body has; when someone loses or gains weight, it’s initially obvious in the face. This is possibly because the eye is (usually) drawn first to the face.

In addition to differences in the amount of body fat, bodies vary vastly in their proportions. The two main ways they differ is skeletally and in fat distribution. The hip to shoulder ratio is skeletal, and someone with wider shoulders might look more powerful or masculine, and someone with wider hips might look more grounded or feminine.

image

The torso to legs ratio is also a skeletal ratio. Someone with long legs in comparison with their torso might look taller than someone of the same height with a long torso, and they might also look skinnier.

image

(I say as I finally get some visual variety all up in here.)

Because the hips are also one of the places with the most weight gain in women, large hips can also be a matter of fat distribution. The three main places where the fat ratio really matters is in the bust, the waist and the hips (making up the core of the body).

While men usually carry weight in the belly area, the fat distribution can really vary with women. Some women carry more weight in the bust, some in the belly, and some in the hips/thighs. Some women carry more weight in two areas, like the bust and the hips, the bust and the belly, or the belly and the hips. Some women show no obvious bias to any area and carry weight equally.

image

[Click here for full size]

Taking into account skeletal ratios, fat distribution patterns, a vast human weight range, muscle tone and age, there are endless permutations of body types. It would be a shame if you used only one!

Oh, and that first image looks really interesting as a gif.

image

(via protocol00)

Filed under anatomy reference body tpes

3,612 notes

f-nodragonart:

SammyTorres dragon tutorials

This person have made quite a few amazing tutorials UvU

Individual links:

Feathers for Dragons

Fur for Dragons

Scales for Dragons

Dragon Heads

Dragon Details

Forelimbs and Hindlimbs for Dragons

Wings for Dragons

How to Construct a Dragon

How to Design a Dragon

HOLY SHIT YEAH I LOVE THESE TUTORIALS

I remember finding them a while back, and thinking, “DAMN I SHOULD TELL THE DRAGON BLOG ABOUT THESE,” but I forgot, and then u beat me to it, aha (tho, some new ones have been added since I last checked, so all for the better I forgot, it seems~)

these tutorials are all so LOVELY, aaaa

I do have a few issues, tho„,

the examples for different wing shoulder placements (in the “how to construct a dragon” tutorial, second-to-last link). honestly, I think the only realistic and plausible way to place wings on a dragon is to place them fully and completely behind the front limbs (the fourth example she drew). the middle two, while the limbs might be able to move separately, they just majorly overcomplicate the dragon’s structure, and would certainly cause muscular movement issues, cus’ the muscles wrap around the skeleton and muscles of the other limb, and it’s just rly too much complication for evolution to ever apply to an animal. then the first example, w/ the wings in front, I get the feeling would set the dragon off-balance at the front, as well as not be the best “lift-point” for the dragon to have (IE- think about lifting up a cat or other small animal. the ideal “lift-point” is more near the center of their ribcage, rather than closer to their front limbs, right?)

also, elbow spines. I mean, her under-skeletal structures for the wings make the spines seem plausible, but at the same time, I just can’t get over how they’d interfere w/ joint movement, no matter how plausibly designed

and then the ear placement. I mean, her placement is perfectly realistic, given the skulls she draws, as their angles are very long/stretched (idk if that part of the jaw is called the “angle” on non-human mandibles, but I’m just gonna assume that it is, here), so her ear placement totally works. I just want to make it clear, to artists looking at these tutorials, that the reason her ears don’t look to be behind the jaw is b/c of that long angle that stretches out under the ear. the actual condyle/pivot-point of the jaw is in front of the ear canal. mandible structure can vary greatly, and, thus, vary the the position of the ear canal, so it’s good to know what kinda jaw/ear canal combo ur workin’ w/, when it comes to ear placement

anyways, thank u for sending such fab tutorials our way!

-Mod Spiral

(via anatomicalart)

Filed under dragons long post creatures tutorial links