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Anonymous asked: Do you have any recommendations on books about perspective/composition/landscape drawings? The books I have only mentions them in very few pages but I really feel I need to practice this, also thank you all for running this great blog. It is a great help!

anatomicalart:

Hello anon!
I’d like to make followers aware that we have a [book] tag which recommends various books. I will ad that this tag isn’t as lush as many of our anatomy tags, and as it is just a little tag for tie time being, will need time to grow to suit your specific needs.

Coincidentally, I just so happen to be sitting next to a perspective obsessed artist, so I’m going to give her the wheel for this question!

Okay, Hello.
It really depends what you want to do with the perspective (what your subject matter is). If you’re drawing in a graphic style, a painterly style, a traditionally accurate style.
I’ll assume you want to simply draw accurate perspective, so if you are learning perspective to get elements ‘right’ in Landscape - outside / countryside traditional, then I personally recommend the book

Creating Textured Landscapes with pen, ink and watercolour’.
[Amazon link, which includes ‘look inside’ preview]


If you are wanting to learn about perspective to know how it works in general…
(meaning) how to create both linear perspective and how to draw in circular perspective then go for the book
Vanishing point’.
[Amazon link, which includes ‘look inside’ preview]

It is important recognise the style you are working in
(i.e. Graphic perspective, painterly perspective, accurate perspective).
and then finding a tutorial on you-tube or finding a perspective book that is going to lend to that. 
YouTube is GREAT for free and helpful tutorials.

Best of luck,
Nat 

In addition to this AnatomicalArt has two useful tags for you.
[Perspective Tag]  and [Composition Tag]
which may also help you in your efforts.

Now to move onto composition!

Composition is all about how your eye travels around the page.
Composition is ALL about, is trying to get the audience to stare at a picture for longer.
A well composed picture will take your eyes on a journey, it will either…

  • Walk you through the entire picture.
    (How long can you make this journey last?)





  • or by highlighting the most important aspect of the picture.

  • OR! Createing an overall shape
    (usually eater a circle, square or triangle)
    Triangles are often considered to be the most important shape once can create in a picture.

The Triangle:




The Circle:


The Square:


Any perspective book will also touch on the idea of composition, so perches of a perspective book is a great idea!

Photography books, surprisingly, may be of more help to you with creating composition then art books. Composition is just such a huge part of photography.
I recommend you take a look at the Photography Composition books in the bookstore next time you visit one. I’m sure you’ll find one that catches your eye.

Perspective takes a LONG time to learn, so do not become distraught if the learning is slow.

Composition is a HARD thing to accomplish, and of course it is impossible to create a composition so perfect your audience will look at your piece forever.

Artists have been studying both composition and perspective for generations and never gotten it ‘perfect’, it is all a matter of opinion, but the more you research, the more you practice, the more you know the more you’ll be able to accomplish! This post only scratches the surface of what perspective and composition has to teach you.
Good luck in your studies!

Kind regards,
-Mamma Katie 

Filed under perspective long post composition advice

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Costume books from the MET available online

omgthatdress:

Wordrobe

Waist Not: Migration of the Waist 1800-1960

Our New Clothes: Acquisitions of the 1990s

Orientalism: Visions of the East in Western Dress

Madame Grès

Infra-Apparel

Haute Couture

Gianni Versace

Dangerous Liaisons: Fashion and Furniture in the Eighteenth Century

Christian Dior

The Ceaseless Century: 300 Years of Eighteenth Century Costume

American Ingenuity: Sportswear 1930s-1970s

Bloom

Bare Witness: Nudity in Fashion

The Age of Napoleon: Costume from Revolution to Empire

Swords into Ploughshares

Two by Two

(via colonelcaroldanvers)

Filed under books clothing links

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annafh asked: Hi! I'm a first year animation student (although nearing the end of first year obviously) and I'm wondering if there are any general tips/advice you can give me? Other than keep drawing, obviously. We're doing 2D at the moment, but we do some 3D next year which is exciting :)

zandraart:

Oh gosh, awesome! Animation is awesome, I’m super happy for you that you’re studying it aaaaa. I wish you only the best in your pursuit of studying animation!

Hmmmm…let me think. I’ll try to give you some tips based on what’s helped me…and things I wish people would’ve told me. Some of it may or may not apply, but you’re wise enough to pick and choose what helps you! I hope you dont mind the long post! Let’s see…

  1.  Do lots of gesture drawing! And I mean lots! I’m sure you’ve heard this a lot already but… it gives you a great library of poses to work from when animating and losens your lines enough to give dynamic movement and posing within them. When I don’t have access to a live model, I use the internet! One of my biggest go to favorite resources for gesture drawing is actually youtube. Look up videos of people dancing to songs. Professional dancers, amateur…and then once you’ve got a video with a dancer that is in full frame, play it for awhile then pause the video. Find a pose you think will be challenging and help you! Then draw it! Pausing videos like this will give you the chance to draw more genuine, movement filled poses that cannot always be an option to draw when in front of a still, posing model. This isnt to say you shouldnt work from live models though; but I’ve found over the years that some variety in what poses you tackle really helps with character acting and fliud animation!

    Also dont be afraid to apply the gesture drawing/pose into one of your own characters! Try to take the pose you see and use it on a cat! What would that look like? How could you make it work? Keep the gears turning!

  2. Slow motion video is a thing! I have the option to shoot a high frame rate on my camera phone, and many times i will take videos of people walking, animals flying…just to play it back and watch it in slow motion. Many youtube channels are dedicated to nothing BUT slow motion! Explosions for special fx…animals running, jumping…balloons popping…hair blowing…all of which can be great reference to go by and study!

  3. Animate lots of different things. One of the biggest things i never expected to enjoy animating was special effects. It’s different in 3D where much of it is learning how to wrangle the computer, but in 2d you can get a lot of acting in even special effects as well. Is the smoke stylized? What about fire? Waves? Breath on a cold day? Don’t shy away from special effects animation. It can only make you better to study it. Dedicate a month to studying it!

  4. Study body language extensively. What makes a person anxious? A hand on their face? What does it mean when someone crosses their arms when talking to someone? How do characters react to negative body language? People are often freaked out at how obsessed I am with studying body language…but in order to make a performance feel natural and fit the intention, it is key to understand how humans (and even animals) communicate beyond words. Conflicting mood and body language can mislead the audience. There are a lot of online body language resources and websites so you shouldnt have any trouble seeking it out! Just google “body language guide” etc until you find what you need!

  5. DO NOT FEAR STRETCH FRAMES. THEY ARE AMAZING. Look at old looney toons cartoons to see what i mean. sometimes using a stretch frame is the only way to continue from one pose to the other. Remember that stretch frames are meant to be FELT not seen, so dont fret if your character ends up looking a little wacky. or stupid. if anything you can frame up your stretch frame later and call it the next picasso. Put a stupid stretch frame as your twitter header. people think that’s hilarious for some reason.

  6. This is important: DO NOT GET ATTACHED TO YOUR ANIMATION FRAMES. This is hard for some people to hear, but the biggest thing in animation is to learn when it’s best to just throw out drawings and frames when they arent working. Just because the pose is appealing doesnt mean it’s going to work in the scene. When in doubt THROW IT OUT. THEN REDRAW IT. THEN THROW IT OUT AGAIN. At my school, we have this phrase called “Kill your puppies”. KILL THEM. LEAVE NO MAN ALIVE. DESTROY KILL DESTROOOYYYy. But in all seriousness no frame is precious, no matter how much you like it. Sometimes frames and poses just DONT WORK. LET IT GOOOOOOO.

  7. Shoot from reference if you are having trouble, but dont rotoscope it! This is simple enough advise i think. 

  8. Do not be afraid to ask other people if they think something is reading or not. Sometimes when you are stuck flipping between the same drawings or watching maya play your scene over and over you lose perspective. Don’t ask people to sugar coat their critique. You need to know if it’s working or not. Not if they think the characters hand looks great.

  9. DRAWN TO LIFE, ANIMATORS SURVIVAL KIT, THE ILLUSION OF LIFE, LOOMIS, “THE ART OF ____” BOOKS. ALL GOOD. FIND PDFs ONLINE. THEY EXIST IN LARGE QUANTITIES.

  10. MAYA IS A DOUCHEBAG. THIS IS LAW. DO NOT FIGHT IT. SAVE EARLY AND SAVE OFTEN. THEN SAVE AGAIN. MAYA LOVES CRASHING JUST TO SPITE YOU.

  11. But really though maya is an amazing program. we hate maya because we love maya. it’s okay.

  12. Learning animation takes time and lots and lots of drawing and study. Animators have the disadvantage of having to draw thousands upon thousands of drawings before their work is done versus and illustrator who only has to draw one really solid image. Understand you will not get fame and fortune from it. Sometimes you won’t even get credit. But that’s okay. You are breathing life into characters…and that is something very little people can do without giving birth first. Take pride in it!

  13. DONT THINK. JUST DO. DO SOMETHING. DO ANYTHING. [x]


That’s just some advise I can think of off the top of my head. I am by no means a seasoned professional, I’m still learning too! But I hope it helps even a little! Best of luck! YOU gOT THIS. WELCOME TO ANIMATION.

Filed under advice animation

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fuckingphotoshop:

addictedtophotoshop:

so i decided to compile as many useful links to various tutorials as i could - not a terribly difficult job, cause i have months’ worth of bookmarks and links scattered in semi-organized word documents stored in this laptop. if this masterpost has been of any use to you at all i’d appreciate if you could like or reblog it!! and maybe check out my theme and photoshop blog? (n˘v˘•)¬  
* all but one of these were NOT made by me!! if you would like one of your tutorials taken down just message me here and it’ll be done.

Read More

fuckingphotoshop:

addictedtophotoshop:

so i decided to compile as many useful links to various tutorials as i could - not a terribly difficult job, cause i have months’ worth of bookmarks and links scattered in semi-organized word documents stored in this laptop. if this masterpost has been of any use to you at all i’d appreciate if you could like or reblog it!! and maybe check out my theme and photoshop blog? (n˘v˘•)¬  

* all but one of these were NOT made by me!! if you would like one of your tutorials taken down just message me here and it’ll be done.

Read More

(via paintbucketresources)

Filed under masterpost links photoshop themes

21,508 notes

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Push it!Clarity is probably the most important thing to think about at all time when boarding. Pushing your poses to an undeniable level of clarity will improve the clarity of the storytelling in general. Don’t leave space for uncertainty in posing out your characters. Your audience will be more engaged and entertained by the sequence.This is the last post for the Super Week. I hope you enjoyed it. Back on the regular schedule next week (Every Tuesday).Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Push it!

Clarity is probably the most important thing to think about at all time when boarding. Pushing your poses to an undeniable level of clarity will improve the clarity of the storytelling in general. Don’t leave space for uncertainty in posing out your characters. Your audience will be more engaged and entertained by the sequence.

This is the last post for the Super Week. I hope you enjoyed it. Back on the regular schedule next week (Every Tuesday).

Norm

Filed under tips advice gestures