Tutorials, References, Tips

Your awesome Tagline

314 notes

cyrilvamp asked: Just so you know you're a flawless creature and I love you and all of your artwork. I've just dropped out of art school, it really took all of my passion out of me. Do you have any suggestions as to how I can get my groove back?

sephiramy:

engelmech:

littlefroggies:

My advice for losing passion or drive is kinda different than most my friends so take that with a grain of salt, but I can only say what’s worked for me: Make yourself work. Doesn’t matter what you’re working on, don’t let yourself sit around not doing anything. You don’t have to take on, like, your opus or anything… but you need to be doing something with your art. You need to make a project, and hold yourself accountable for finishing it. Even if it looks like trash or its a failed experiment, its okay to make bad stuff. You learn from making bad stuff. Just keep your hands busy, keep your brain busy.

If I waited for when I felt my “groove” or had passion for it, I’d probably be out of a job because there was a 3 month period not long ago when I was burnt out and tired of drawing/writing, but I had to cuz its my job. I did good work I was proud of, regardless of being in my groove. I just had to find a motivation that wasn’t passion for those 3 months… which turned out to be “fear of not getting paid” and “refusing to drop quality.”

I am not of the opinion people should only work when they feel inspired. Sometimes, you just have to do it. You have to sit down and work. You have to find a reason to keep going at it during the times when the passion isn’t there, cuz the passion will not always be there.

like I said, take my advise with a grain of salt. This is what’s worked for me and how I function.

This is very good advice.

This advice resounds with me, too. There is a quote from Nick Cave that I really like on this topic: “I go into my office every day that I’m in Brighton and work. Whether I feel like it or not is irrelevant. Inspiration is nice, but if you only work when it strikes, you’re going to be an unhappy artist. This is especially true if you want to earn a living at it; you don’t hear about surgeons getting “surgeon’s block” or garbage men getting “garbage men’s block.” There are assuredly days when the surgeon doesn’t want to be removing gall-bladders, but she does it anyway, because that’s her job.”

(I do also totally echo that the advice isn’t for everybody. Everyone works different ways, so far as creating stuff goes. I think this is pretty solid, though.)

Filed under advice general advice motivation

410 notes

Anonymous asked: pst hi friend i love all your art really a lot and i was wondering if you had any art tips for someone trying to get better? thank u

littledeerling:

Hi friend! Thanks a lot, I’m glad you like my art. And I do! This is gonna be super long… but here are 10 tips that have helped me and still help me and hopefully it will help you too!!

1. Draw as much as you can - better yet, draw one or multiple things a day! It doesn’t even have to be anything finished, even something like an eye or a hand is a good start, but try to aim to do maybe a page of doodles a day. You can even pick a theme and then go from there.

2. Get someone to critique your art – I think this is one of the most important things!! Sometimes we don’t really notice our own mistakes (maybe we’re looking at it for so long or you just don’t know how to approach a certain part of it), but other people will be able to see it. Get someone who is honest and will tell you what’s wrong with your drawing and what to improve on.

3. Set up a reference folder - Drawing from your head is really great and all, but you need to learn the basics of anatomy before you can learn how to distort and shape your style in your own way.

4. Don’t hide things – People tend to hide things they’re not good at like hands behind the back, feet covered with clothes or even covering one side of the face (something I’m guilty of doing for sure…) Every time you do that you deprive yourself of getting better at that specific thing because if you’re not drawing it you’ll never get better at it. Even if you draw it out and it looks bad, it’s better than not drawing it at all.

5. Draw things you’re not good at – if you know you need to improve on something, lips for example, then buy a sketchbook and literally fill it with lips. In fact, get multiple sketchbooks and fill it with things you’re not good at and then you’ll start to see yourself getting better, page by page.

6. Try different things – Experiment with styles, colour, mediums, whatever! The best part about drawing is that you can do so many things with it and I find that using other mediums really help improve my drawing skill. 

7. Make an inspiration tumblr/folder/wall – I find looking at art I really love really motivates me to get better and it helps me learn new techniques. It gives you something to aspire to, plus pretty art always looks great on your wall!

8. Draw from life - This sounds boring, I know, and it’s definitely something I don’t particularly enjoy but I find that it’s extremely helpful. Not only does it help you get better at drawing anatomy, people, object etc, etc, but it helps you learn how to observe. Learning to observe is crucial, but don’t just look at things, STUDY them. Watch people interact, shift your arms in different angles, move your light source around and make mental notes in your head. Become a camera and use your hands to record your images.

9. Look at Tutorials – No shame in learning new things! Sometimes I watch a video or walkthrough by one of my fav artists and I learn easier ways to do things that would have otherwise taken me an hour or two to do. You can learn some really cool tips and tricks that you would have never thought of yourself.

10. Don’t worry so much – Progress might be slow, maybe other artists improve faster than you and that’s okay!! Try not to get frustrated because there are artists that are “better than you”. Art is really subjective and people enjoy different styles so it really doesn’t matter how “good” or “bad” you are. If you enjoy what you draw then other people will too.  

Filed under advice drawing tips general advice

64,139 notes

solar-citrus:

I’ve received a lot of letters from artists asking to check out their artwork and their blog, and I’ve noticed that a lot of them openly write unhealthy amounts of negative comments about their artwork, it was super depressing, honestly.  :(
Confidence plays a very very important role as an artist, it’s what helps us learn and grow without the constant feeling of doubt and jealousy!  You are a unique individual who must go down your own unique path, and as scary as it sounds, you can’t rely on others to hold your hand all the way through.  You are the only one who can get yourself to where you need to go, and beating up your artwork is not the way!  Trust yourself and your abilities to make a change, and you can do anything!!

Love your art, love yourself!

(via ibelievepracticemakesperfect)

Filed under motivation confidence advice

3,126 notes

bigfatbug:

hi everybody, recently i’ve been seeing a lot of people around the internet talking about experiencing drawing related pain
it feels like the right time to publicly recommend this extremely informative and well-researched minicomic by kriota willberg. i carry a copy with me everywhere and tell friends about it all the time because it is super helpful and has helped me unlearn some bad drawing habits and learn plenty of healthy new ones!
in 60 pages it covers
drawing positions that lessen stress on your muscles
a wide variety of easy exercises (and sample routines)
small lifestyle changes you can make to keep healthy
and when to tell if prevention isn’t enough and you need to see a doctor
you can buy it HERE and HERE. it’s very thorough, the author knows a lot about muscles and the body as well as about the specifics of drawing and it really shows. even if you haven’t experienced drawing pain yet, integrating this stuff into your routine is a good way to start taking preventative measures
stay safe and healthy everyone!

bigfatbug:

hi everybody, recently i’ve been seeing a lot of people around the internet talking about experiencing drawing related pain

it feels like the right time to publicly recommend this extremely informative and well-researched minicomic by kriota willberg. i carry a copy with me everywhere and tell friends about it all the time because it is super helpful and has helped me unlearn some bad drawing habits and learn plenty of healthy new ones!

in 60 pages it covers

  • drawing positions that lessen stress on your muscles
  • a wide variety of easy exercises (and sample routines)
  • small lifestyle changes you can make to keep healthy
  • and when to tell if prevention isn’t enough and you need to see a doctor

you can buy it HERE and HERE. it’s very thorough, the author knows a lot about muscles and the body as well as about the specifics of drawing and it really shows. even if you haven’t experienced drawing pain yet, integrating this stuff into your routine is a good way to start taking preventative measures

stay safe and healthy everyone!

(via royalpoots)

Filed under health wrist pain links important

1,079 notes

Anonymous asked: How did you motivate yourself to start your comic? I'm trying to start a comic right now, but I keep worrying about dumb things like art thieves and people who in general won't like it. How did you get past these things and begin?

lackadaisycats:

Well, nothing ventured, nothing gained, right? 

Theft and haters should probably be the least of your worries at this stage, honestly. Focus your energy on telling a good story, developing an artistic approach that complements the story, communicating effectively with your dialogue and your page layouts, working out a production schedule, and just hunkering down and doing the work (which will probably amount to more blood, sweat and tears than you can prepare for, assuming you haven’t done this before). Those are the things that are really worth troubling yourself over because that’s ultimately how the undertaking becomes fulfilling…they’re the satisfying meaty bits of a creative diet…the marrow even…
…the colorful, delightsome dehydrated marshmallows in the soggy, beige compost of your breakfast cereal…not altogether unlike Life cereal, but not exactly Life, which is a shame because that would really drive this metaphor home…like the Kool Aid man through your living room wall…
(Help me)

There will be people who won’t like your comic. It’s not hard to distinguish thoughtful criticism from ridicule and resentment, though. Filter out the former and sift through it for useful information. As to the latter, well, electronic outrage from anonymous assholes is rather a fact of life in this day and age, isn’t it? No matter who you are, what you do, what your art looks like, how you write, or what you choose to write about, there are going to be people out there who’ll glean some perverse satisfaction from telling you how much they hate it. You can’t spend your life hiding away from inevitable nonsense like that, though, and trying to tiptoe around it by making everyone happy is limiting, sterilizing, and equally futile. Come to grips with the existence of the vitriol, know that along the way at least a little of it will pelt you in the face, and though it will quite probably sting, understand that it’s often more about the individual it’s coming from and their personal issues than it is about your work…then move along because other things are more important. Do the comic for your own gratification foremost. Do it how you want to do it. Do it genuinely for your love of the art, the process, the story, the characters. When you love it, it’ll sustain your interest and will demand to be done with integrity. The quality of your output will reflect that - work really shines when you’ve loved it so much it could kill you - and the quality of the feedback you get will tend to coincide.

Art thievery is a pain in the ass, to be sure, and while it can make you feel like crumpling into a heap, lashing out, setting the internet on fire, becoming a cave hermit on impulse, crying and rage-vomiting all at the same time, incidents are fairly uncommon. When they do happen, they’re usually minor and the internal melodrama is quickly replaced with resolve to continue along and address the problem as best you can. Someone reposting something you made and taking credit for it, slapping your art on a set of table coasters and putting it up for sale in an Etsy store, compiling it with a bunch of other things into a slipshod publication or app - these things happen, they’re vexing, but they aren’t career-ending catastrophes and they’re usually not particularly detrimental to anything but your pride. For rarer but more heinous situations involving revenues and corporations that should know better, the art community at large is usually quick to come to the outspoken defense and aid of artists who have clearly been wronged. You can take sensible precautions as well, like including your copyright information on everything and registering trademarks if you’re making a business of your art.

Yes, conceivably something terrible and personally devastating could happen, but you have to weigh for yourself whether all the good that can come of putting your work out there - the people you’ll share something with, the friends you’ll make, the connections you’ll establish with other artists, the things you stand to learn, the freelance and job opportunities you’ll create for yourself - is worth the risk. I’ve had my share of art theft headaches and heartaches, but if I had to make the choice again, I wouldn’t flinch in decision to share my work online. It has made all the difference in my life and career as an artist, as it has for many others.

Well, that was a lot of words.  Sorry. I hope it contains something useful. Good luck with your comic!

Filed under motivation advice writing comics